Brazen Careerist is my third startup. People ask me all the time why I gave up my position as CEO. If you knew what startup life was really like, you would ask me why I was CEO for as long as I was.

When I started building the brand of Brazen Careerist around the year 2000, I talked about ideas like job hopping as a way to build a solid career, and I warned that generation Y’s entry into the workforce would be a total shock to employers. I was labeled a heretic and a moron.

But pretty quickly, people started thinking I was right. And I started making $15,000 a speech to discuss these ideas.

The intoxication of being on a trend, and knowing how to monetize it and being excited about being right, that’s what makes someone do a startup. So I picked up two partners, I launched Brazen Careerist, and quickly, Mashable called us the number-one social networking site for Gen Y. We were on a roll.

We raised money. We launched products, we pivoted 20 times. We were due to raise more money right after the markets crashed. So of course we couldn’t raise money. And of course I did what all startup founders do when they run out of money: I had a shit fit. And then I had a nervous breakdown.

But the thing is, in a startup, everything moves at warp speed, even a nervous breakdown. So I recovered fast, convinced investors to put in more money. And we kept going.

That cycle happened twice. Which is normal. Because startups are hell, and a startup is the perfect convergence of a brilliant idea and a founder just crazy enough to stick with it through anything.

At that point, I was exhausted. And I had to figure out: When is it time for a founder to step down? So I went through a time of personal assessment, which taught me a lot about when you know it’s time for a founder to leave:

Financial exhaustion
I had funded the idea with my own money for a few years before I launched Brazen Careerist as a social recruiting platform. I ruined my credit, I cashed out my 401K (don’t ever do this!) and I lost a baby sitter because she was appalled that we didn’t have any food in the refrigerator.

Emotional exhaustion
I had traveled every week for a year giving those speeches. You’d think I’d have saved a lot of money, but you’d be surprised how much it costs to run a household if you have two kids and are never home to see them. Then I spent a year traveling every week to raise money and being on television and missing my kids.

Marital exhaustion
The dirty secret about startup founders is they can’t keep marriages together. Part of the reason for this is they are crazy to begin with. And part of the reason is that you have to be married to your company to do a startup. So divorce rates are high, especially among women, because they are much less likely to have a spouse who is willing to stay home and keep the family intact.

So I got a divorce. It was on the cover of the New York Times. And all PR is good PR, of course, but I realized, while I was going through the process, that I wanted a successful marriage more than I wanted a successful career. And then I thought, “No. I want both.” And I became exhausted wondering how women get both. (Until I realized, oh, this is why women don’t do startups.)

Intellectual exhaustion
And it was time to pivot. It was time to turn Brazen Careerist into an event-based social recruiting service. And I knew a lot about recruiting, but I was going to have to learn more. And really, you have to live and breathe the industry you are in if you’re going to rewrite the rules to that industry.

And I was already contemplating my next topic: Generation Z. I think that Generation Z will revolutionize school like Gen Y revolutionized work. I think homeschooling is going to be a huge trend that impacts startups, and corporate life, and I was really curious about that. My brain was refocusing whether I wanted it to or not.

Relationship exhaustion
While I was appearing on shows like 20/20 to tell the world how to manage Generation Y, I was having knock-down drag-out fights with my Gen-Y co-founder, Ryan Healy. Founder bickering is a common startup problem. Because if you have co-founders with different skill sets, which you should, then you are going to have different points of view, and inevitably, arguments about that.

Vision for where to go next
Fortunately, though, Ryan had not ruined his personal finances and he didn’t have kids. So he still had lots of energy to get the company to the next level. And after seeing all these issues listed on paper, I realized that even though I loved Brazen Careerist, I wanted to step down from the CEO position.

So I started a relentless campaign to get one of the investors, Ed Barrientos, to become CEO. He had already had big exits from two of his own companies. As part of my campaign I told him it could be an interim position (it wasn’t) and part of the campaign was to convince him that it was the right time for me to step down.

It was hard to step down, but I needed a vacation. I wanted to have a life. I married a farmer and moved myself and the kids (and sort-of even my ex) to a farm in rural Wisconsin.

And after I’d had a break, I found myself calling Ryan and Ed more and more. I took a keen interest at the board meetings (I’m still a major shareholder) and I asked to be more and more involved, albeit in a different role, which they eagerly accommodated.

For me, stepping down was the right thing to do. It feels right that I took a break when I needed one, and that I did it at a time when the company was in good hands. Also, it feels good that I can still contribute while I figure out how to get my next business off the ground. Because after all that trouble — the physical, financial, emotional exhaustion — I can’t stop doing startups. It’s just who I am.

111 replies
Newer Comments »
  1. Tommi
    Tommi says:

    Great review about the balance between being enthralled by the creation of something new, interesting and significant and the exhaustion that follows from all the trouble. The way you write your story sounds as if it has pretty bi-polar highs and lows.

    Is the balance good / getting better? I guess the blog says so, I hope you have enough of the fun challenges of starting up with your new ideas. 

    Tommi

  2. Maureen Sharib
    Maureen Sharib says:

    Few people (in this country) understand the entrepreneurial mind.
    Maybe it’s because of the schooling they’ve received.
    Maybe you’ll help change that.
    I hope so.
    The United States NEEDS entrepreneurs.
    Now more than ever.

  3. A reader..
    A reader.. says:

    Hi Penelope, I love the all-white picture in the tub. You look so pretty and also, so exhausted. Please take good care of yourself. My mind has been going towards taking off on my own for a while now, though there is tons of skill-building that needs to be done before it. I want to be excellent in my creations. It helps to know the reality. I can imagine all that responsibility and worry. Helps to be single at this stage yet I would also think, a family, the right kind of family/partner, can provide that buffer – that good emotional and even financial support. Overall, the joy of creating my own life, being master of what I choose to do with my time/day, and following my passion at the same time is what draws me to this route. There is always some compromise, however the independent adventure in the pursuit of what I’d love to do, that is, to create all day, trumps everything for me. Let us see how my reality matches up.. when I come to it :).

  4. Mark Wiehenstroer
    Mark Wiehenstroer says:

    ” It was time to turn Brazen Careerist into an event-based social recruiting service.” 
    While LinkedIn is a very different environment than Brazen Careerist, they’ve just recently introduced a new product named Talent Pipeline and they’re becoming more a network for recruiters -http://www.marketwatch.com/story/linkedin-announces-talent-pipeline-one-place-for-recruiters-to-grow-track-and-stay-connected-with-all-their-talent-leads-2011-10-18 

    Pivot -there’s one thing you can count on and that’s change because if you don’t do it or somehow don’t accommodate for it, you will suffer or may even cease to exist.

  5. Marius
    Marius says:

    Great insights, especially when entrepreneurship has been recently glorified to the point of absurdity. Sometimes I think people forget it’s hard work, often incredibly rewarding, but very hard. Also – I like the last sentence: “It’s just who I am” .. I agree –  some.. can’t help it !

  6. Marius
    Marius says:

    Great insights, especially when entrepreneurship has been recently glorified to the point of absurdity. Sometimes I think people forget it’s hard work, often incredibly rewarding, but very hard. Also – I like the last sentence: “It’s just who I am” .. I agree –  some.. can’t help it !

  7. Karelys Beltran
    Karelys Beltran says:

    love the picture. and this post makes me think i’m sort of lost and need to pause for a sec and figure out what’s next. throughout my life what has saved me lost of grief is watching people mess up and make sure i don’t follow the same path. before getting married i was career oriented and married to my ideals and goals. i feel a bit lost now that i’m reconsidering but i know for sure that i’d rather do it now than before after a divorce or a big wedge in my relationship. thanks for the honesty. it’s great stuff. honesty is always great stuff.

  8. Mjaumock
    Mjaumock says:

    And all this time I thought “shit fit” and “nervous breakdown” were more or less the same thing.

    If I didn’t love you already Penelope, this blog post would have done the trick. You rock my world, lady!

  9. Irving Podolsky
    Irving Podolsky says:

    As usual, love your stories about your “brazen” life.

    And now, day by day, we are all waiting with baited-breath for your next start-up:

    Brazen Goat Cheese! (To be used as a cracker spread, furniture polish, and body shampoo.)

    By the way, my wife is hooked on goat butter, which is sort of hard to get. So there’s your niche, baby! GOAT for it!

    Your pal,
    Irv

  10. Norm
    Norm says:

    Love the picture.  Great Melissa.  I understand completely about you wanting to build another business.  I was self employed in the bar/restaurant business for fifteen years, and even wrote a very popular web site about part of it, but ended up calling it quits.  All the stuff you spoke of is true and you definately work harder being self employed.  But now after seven years, I wish I would have continued.  Working for someone, a boss if you will, is the worst thing that can someone can do.  Keep going and evolving.  You’ll be glad you did.

  11. Scott McIntosh
    Scott McIntosh says:

    Penelope, I think you set the record for links in this post. I love that. I’m not sure at what point I joined your readership but it helps to go back and see the parts I missed.

  12. Scott McIntosh
    Scott McIntosh says:

    Penelope, I think you set the record for links in this post. I love that. I’m not sure at what point I joined your readership but it helps to go back and see the parts I missed.

  13. Clark Harris
    Clark Harris says:

    Great post Penelope. I’m on a 5 year epic myself with a lot of my own and a lot of investors money. I’ve almost cashed in IRA few times, but stopped myself. My marriage of two years is going strong, but my wife is starting to feel the effects of the uncertainty she thought she was in the tail end when she met me. 

    It’s always helpful to know that we entrepreneurs are not alone and that are other crazy people out there who can’t help themselves from going down this path. Yesterday the emotional roller coaster was at the bottom for me and today it’s back to where it needs to be for me to be motivated and focused. I live in the mountains and find that getting that balance of nature and work does wonders. Once I’m fully recharged I can do more in 30 hours than 60 when I’m drained. 

    Hang in there and keep the insightful posts coming. 

  14. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    How do you find people with the need that is worth $15,000 to have you talk interestingly about relevant topics? I feel like, in my life, I am CONSTANTLY mismatched in terms of providing ideas and solutions to audiences incapable of valuing them appropriately. The cynic in me discounts the value, but really, it’s worth that much to somebody…so how do we find the right people?

  15. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    How do you find people with the need that is worth $15,000 to have you talk interestingly about relevant topics? I feel like, in my life, I am CONSTANTLY mismatched in terms of providing ideas and solutions to audiences incapable of valuing them appropriately. The cynic in me discounts the value, but really, it’s worth that much to somebody…so how do we find the right people?

  16. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    How do you find people with the need that is worth $15,000 to have you talk interestingly about relevant topics? I feel like, in my life, I am CONSTANTLY mismatched in terms of providing ideas and solutions to audiences incapable of valuing them appropriately. The cynic in me discounts the value, but really, it’s worth that much to somebody…so how do we find the right people?

  17. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    How do you find people with the need that is worth $15,000 to have you talk interestingly about relevant topics? I feel like, in my life, I am CONSTANTLY mismatched in terms of providing ideas and solutions to audiences incapable of valuing them appropriately. The cynic in me discounts the value, but really, it’s worth that much to somebody…so how do we find the right people?

  18. Jerry Rizzo
    Jerry Rizzo says:

    Penelope, Firstly, big fan of BC.  Everyone is ready to leap into startups, but when they realize it’s not all lunches and cool events the perspective changes.  I think your depiction is spot on.  I interact with a lot of startup CEOs and various other entrepreneurs on The Dotted Line (http://www.facebook.com/TDLine), which is an online community for folks like us.  Definitely check it out and drum up some convo.  Again, awesome post and keep up the good work.  I look forward to watching BC grow. –Jerry

  19. liz
    liz says:

    Penelope, you look amazing!  I can’t believe you’ve had two kids!  I know that you’ve blogged about your diet and exercise program in earlier posts (after pregnancy) but I was wondering if you might be able to share some of that now, for your current regime.  I need some inspiration for the upcoming winter months!  Any tips would be appreciated.

  20. Chloe
    Chloe says:

    My children were homeschooled and they definitely fit your Gen Z model. Both decided to take a pass on college. Since my generation DOES consider parenting a competitive sport this left me without much to brag about with my peers, much to my chagrin.

    But now my 22yo daughter owns her own business and her own home. My 21yo son was just promoted to a managerial position at Starbucks beating out three others who have degrees and more seniority.

    The secret of their success? My homeschooled children came out of school knowing how to talk to adults. They knew how to look adults in the eye, shake their hands, and talk to them in an adult manner since they weren’t raised by their peers as public schooled children are. My children were raised by adults to become adults.

    The road has been rocky for me though. Penelope, I’m not sure a woman can really have it all. I think this one may dwell in the realm of myth. Choices must be made. I chose marriage and my children over my career. But now I’m trying to figure out what to do so that my children don’t have to take care of me when I’m old.

    • Micha Elyi
      Micha Elyi says:

      “I’m not sure a woman can really have it all.”-Chloe

      I’m sure they can’t.  After all, men never could.  (Duh.)

    • Tony
      Tony says:

      Your comment inspires me. Although we have not chosen to homeschool, we have chosen Private School and we emphasize projects, public speaking, and entrepreneurship to our kids to give them a leg up when they are adults. Kudos to you Chloe! Also funny, because one of my kids name is Chloe as well!

  21. Help4newmoms
    Help4newmoms says:

    Listen, I’m just going to say it. I flat-out love everything you write. I’m a recent graduate of brazen careerist and my favorite part of the course was when you were involved! Question for you. Does it frustrate you that women don’t have the same freedom to explore their potential from a career standpoint if they are a wife and mother, yet men do? I know it’s a hackneyed platitude but it seems awfully true to me and it chaps my ax, to quote from dumb and dumber. It has always seemed dumb to me that a mother’s ambition by necessity must be curtailed when in fact society is missing out on her contributions. Women are obviously built with the intellect to do such things, it doesn’t plop out with the placenta for gosh sakes, why not devise a plan to keep everyone contributing if they wish and take care of the children?

    • Chloe
      Chloe says:

      It starts with breastfeeding. Women can. Men can’t. There is no way around that. Breastmilk is the superior infant food and only the mother can provide it. And the milk isn’t the only important thing that comes from breastfeeding. The distance from the face that happens in breastfeeding (can happen in bottlefeeding, but often doesn’t), the eye contact, the fact that the mother’s entire attention is on the infant, all these factors are important to human development.

      A mother must be available every 2-3 hours to breastfeed, and ideally breastfeeding would last in the range of 1-2 years. Some women can pump, but not all. Most women’s milk supply eventually diminishes if she isn’t available for frequent feeds several hours a day (that means that working mothers who pump during the day need to free-feed at night). 

      Long-term, society probably gets the most out the the contribution made by mothers who curtail their career ambitions and attend to the needs of her young. Society needs more well-raised human beings than it needs start-ups and and widgets.

      • Help4newmoms
        Help4newmoms says:

        Yikes! If a woman wants to breastfeed exclusively every 2 hours until her baby is two years old, more power to her. Some mothers would like to be mothers and have some stimulation outside of motherhood and not have to wait until their child is 18 to get that stimulation. Breasts aside, women were also given the desire to achieve self actualization, just like men. If a woman needs to achieve that actualization outside of being a mother, she should have the opportunity to do so. Men can be fathers and be successful in careers women should be able to as well.

        • Chloe
          Chloe says:

          I’ve known some long-term nursers, but I’ve never known a woman who breastfed for 18 years!

          Your post points to the sad fact that we live in a society that pits the wants of the mother against the needs of the child.

          Women might want stimulation, but the baby needs an attentive and present mother for the first formative years. Yes, babies can survive without that, but not without a cost to the child (and maybe to the mother since studies show a lower breast cancer risk for women who breastfeed). 

          • Nessa
            Nessa says:

            I am so tired of the self-righteous “breast is best!” arguments. Breastfeeding used to be a necessity. Now, thanks to progress, it is a choice. I stopped breastfeeding at about five months because I decided my baby would probably rather I not be CRAZY. I won’t begrudge you your choice to breastfeed–just as you have no right to begrudge any woman her choice NOT to.

          • Nessa
            Nessa says:

            Maybe, but that’s none of your business. Like I said, you are self-righteous and wrong in your assumption that you are entitled to critique other women’s priorities. 

          • Nessa
            Nessa says:

            Maybe, but that’s none of your business. Like I said, you are self-righteous and wrong in your assumption that you are entitled to critique other women’s priorities. 

          • Nessa
            Nessa says:

            Maybe, but that’s none of your business. Like I said, you are self-righteous and wrong in your assumption that you are entitled to critique other women’s priorities. 

          • Chloe
            Chloe says:

            A little sensitive, huh? I didn’t come here and say, “Nessa is a bad mother because she only breastfed 5 mos.” You are reading a lot into my words. 

            What I said was that breastfeeding is almost always best for the baby. That’s a scientific and indisputable fact. But because our society ignores biological realities and children are not valued in our culture–money and prestige are what are valued–a woman who chooses to give her infant the best food often has to make career sacrifices to provide that food..

            To say that fathers ought to man up is not off the mark, but no matter how much a father loves his child he cannot breastfeed. 

            And, by the way, breastfeeding is my business. I’ve helped thousands of women breastfeed their infants in the past 20+ years. It’s part of what I do for a living.

            I also help women bottlefeed and I do that very well because I do believe that it is better for a baby to be fed formula than to be breastfed by a resentful mother.

            But the medical fact is that breastmilk is simply the superior food in every conceivable way. A mother can either provide that, or she can’t.

            A lot of things in life are the best and we can’t do them for whatever reason. But that doesn’t make those things not the best.

          • Aquinas Heard
            Aquinas Heard says:

            Chloe,

            I think breastfeeding is ideal too. I applaud your decision for having done so. I too think that it is unfortunate that are society is not currently flexible enough to more easily allow for a woman to be a start-up entrepreneur and a mom at the same time. I’d be interested to hear what changes you think could be realistically made to do so?

          • Help4newmoms
            Help4newmoms says:

            I’m afraid it is not so black and white. Moms today are convinced that there is a guarantee for a happy health baby. If She breastfeeds, refuses an epidural, co-sleeps, home schools, attachment parent, wear my baby, etc. My baby will be safe and happy. Don’t get me wrong, all those things might be great things to do, but the truth is that the guarantee is an illusion. It’s complicated. There are many recipes to building a happy childhood for your child Whatever you decide to do, I believe that a good mom, a happy mom makes a happy family, a happy child. For some moms that means working. For some moms that means not working outside the home. Whatever she decides to do and however she decides to parent, a happy, engaged, plugged in mom is good place to start. The pressure that society and moms place on themselves and others is not helpful. Support and coming up with new ways to do things would be much more helpful. I have always wished for an arrangement where both my husband and I could work part time and take care of the kids part time. We would each get a chance at the outside world and appreciate each others roles.. So far… Not an option..but a girl can hope can’t she?

      • Lindsay
        Lindsay says:

        I don’t know. I agree with you on the value of breastfeeding, but I think society would beneift enormously from more women occupying careers held mostly by men. I mean, you’re doubling the size of the talent pool, for one. How much more advanced would we be right now if women had been allowed to contribute over the last centuries? For instance,  how much sooner could we have had scientific advances? Taking half the population out of the equation does no one any real favours.

        • Chloe
          Chloe says:

          I agree with you. 

          What would be nice is if we lived in a society that made room for the biological needs of half the human population; the half that bears the much, much, much heavier burden of reproduction.  I am certainly not saying that women cannot do both career and children, but the way the game is set up right now, they usually cannot do both very easily.As a long-time woman who has known lots and lots of women, most women do make a choice that tilts to one side or the other when it comes to mothering and careers. Both have consequences. Certainly my choices have financial and emotional consequences that might end up being quite severe considering the 10 blank years where I made no income while raising children fulltime.I console myself that while I might end up living in a yurt next to the freeway subsisting on government cheese, at least my kids will call.

          I wonder if things won’t change until women and men stand up and demand that a woman’s huge contribution to humanity–the making of new human beings–be treated as important as it is.

          • Motorcitymadhouse
            Motorcitymadhouse says:

            It is not society making room for biological needs, it is the capital system that is at fault. This is partly due to it being set-up by men!;o) If the last few years have proved anything then it is simply that. It strives for optimization, innovation and constant growth which is not feasible in a planet that only provides limited resources. We are all human and not numbers.

  22. Anthony
    Anthony says:

    Great post,
    Penolope. Entrepreneurship does not always "happen" like what you read in all
    those books that sell so well –

    It seems
    that to be a successful entrepreneur you will have to have some extraordinary
    personal characteristics that guide you during the process. Maybe it is a good
    idea to examine what personal characteristics that is useful to evolve and what
    are useful to have to be better prepared for handling those "things" that are
    inevitable to happen.
    Best regards,
    /Anthony Crowdwell http://www.crowdwell.com

  23. Aquinas Heard
    Aquinas Heard says:

    Great article! And you are very right about the trend of homeschooling. In fact I’m launching a “start-up” to cater to this trend. I’m a current small business owner(gymnastics instruction) and former owner of a small private elementary school. I look forward to reading more of your articles, as this was the first (found through Instapundit link).

  24. Anonymous
    Anonymous says:

    Is it my imagination or are most female startups just selling arm waving bullshit.  I am in my 74th year and just finished making an probabilistic estimate of the cost a foreign international state owned oil company would incur if they had a well blowout similar to the one BP had last year.  I don’t care if someone is a gen XYZ or P; I’ll bet there isn’t one male in 500,000 or one female in 2,000,000 who could do the task I just finished in 3 weeks..  However, the big money is made by the clever Arm Waving BSers.  Techies get the hind tit.

    • redrock
      redrock says:

      hahaha. seriously. I am sure you are an excellent engineer/economist/scientist, and are doing excellent work, it sounds actually quite fascinating to me. But where in all the world do you pull out the numbers with respect to men and women who could or could not do the job? 

  25. Slewis1060
    Slewis1060 says:

    So what is the best way to keep your marriage in tact while doing a startup.  I have a lovely wife who gives me a lot of room.  But…working full time at a JOB and blogging at night until 1 or 2 am can cause a strain on a relationship.  Just wondering if you would share an idea on your insights into this dilema??  Thanks so much!

  26. Walter
    Walter says:

    Read your article on not hiring grad students and had to know more about you so went to your blog. Fascinating. And, scary. I admire your pluck. Quick (and true) story: I was asked at an interview why I thought I was best suited for the job and I responded spontaneously “I don’t have an MBA”. The interviewer laughed, the rest of the interview went well, and two days later I was called back for a second interview and got the job. That was in 1995. Even then, there was some question about the value of having a graduate degree, I believe. My job experience and references turned out to be much more valuable in actually getting hired.

  27. Terra Jarvis
    Terra Jarvis says:

    Dear Penelope,

    How are you doing these days? Well, I am writing you because you are very knowledgeable on reality and the big picture. Here it goes…my husband and I are thinking about moving to NYC. It has been my dream since HS. We are both 40 now. We currently live in Las Vegas, Nevada. We have 18,000 in funds to make the move and more in savings. We do not want to touch our savings or our 401K. We are planning on moving there in an apartment for around $1,500.00 a month. We want to get jobs once we arrive. My husband works for the Bricklayers Union BAC #1. He wants to work for a year with them and then start going to college at the DeVry University full time. I would like to finish my schooling online as a Technical Writer and work full time. Do you think we are being unrealisitc in thinking we can move to New York and go to school full time and work. I am just finishing up my AA. He will be just starting college for the first time. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Sincerely,

    T. Jarvis

  28. Drew Shobbrook
    Drew Shobbrook says:

    I have only ever worked for myself, and it was when I did a partnership that I went through what you posted here. I have moved from IT to bookkeeping now and I am rebuilding myself.

  29. Matt
    Matt says:

    Great article. PLEASE write a book or a more detailed blog. Needs to be more ‘from the coal face’ writings about startups, the good and the bad, to guide the next generation of founders and investors.

  30. Christian Michael
    Christian Michael says:

    Doing a startup does take a special kind of person but for some, you don’t need to make such as massive commitment to make a new business a sucess. However, there is a very close correlation between the amount of time and effort that you place into a new startup and the probability of it surviving. The trade off between time and effort in a new business is the lack of time and effort that you have to place in your personal life. Hence, people that do startup their own businesses and make a success of them, tend to be the ones with strains in their private lives in my humble opinion.

  31. Robinsh
    Robinsh says:

    If you want to live the big dreams the dreams rated as extraordinary then it becomes a necessity to ignore the small ones what causes a lot of disturbance in your business life what is my assumption and you are the one who already lived that all.

    Thanks for sharing this article here because now I would like to be prepared for my future managing several startups from my high school days.

  32. Brooke
    Brooke says:

    I can relate in the sense of being married to an entrepreneur who has crazy ideas! It took me a long time to accept it & be an encouraging wife & work with him as a team.

    I can agree that being your own boss & running a business can cause marriages to fail but for me it has started to make us stronger! (but ONLY because we are working as a team & supporting each other instead of going our separate ways)

    I am interested in reading more of your ideas for a school revolution! =) I homeschooled in high school & plan to homeschool my kids as well… I think it creates a better & higher education with more mature kids becoming adults & being better prepared for the adult world!

  33. Tashina Cross
    Tashina Cross says:

    thanks for the post! i know exactly how this feels! well, except the success part but i’m only on take 1… so that’s not so bad right?… i know the failures, the feeling inadequate, the shit fit, the deep desire for a life, etc… i’m taking a 5-yr hiatus until my son is out of high school. i’ll be back… i love the turmoil… and i’ve learned a lot! thanks for the motivation! i needed to hear feel that edge in your voice. (or maybe that was mine….)
    http://tashinacross.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/this-morning/

  34. R.A.
    R.A. says:

    Thank you so much for your candor. All we ever hear about is the glamorous, exciting side of being apart of a startup. No one ever talks about the toll it takes on you and those around you.

  35. Naomi
    Naomi says:

    WHERE was this post 2 years ago for me?! This is ALL SO TRUE! Fortunately I started my company WITH my husband, which while it comes with its own struggles, means we are TOGETHER all the time and managing the kids together (we have 3 and the last 2 have been born within the last 28 months). Funny and so true. I had no idea what I was getting myself into but now we are the fastest growing childbirth education company in the world, we have professionals in 6 countries already and are growing every day.

    Thanks for the great story.

  36. Mr Kaan
    Mr Kaan says:

    Inspiring, we think we can do everything and, in the end, the successful people are the ones that master the art of saying no to things.
    //Mr Kaan
    TheYoungCareerist.com

Newer Comments »

Comments are closed.